Month: December 2020

There has been continual progress in expanding immunization programs over time, but even before the COVID-19 pandemic, tens of millions of children worldwide were not receiving basic doses of vaccines. New research finds that there continue to be significant disparities in childhood vaccination, and poorer children from under-represented and minority groups in most countries are
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Through small, neighborhood classes, researchers at UPMC Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh and Promundo-US significantly reduced sexual violence among teenage boys living in areas of concentrated disadvantage. The study, published today in JAMA, is the culmination of a large Centers for Disease Control and Prevention clinical trial spanning 20 racially segregated neighborhoods in the Pittsburgh area
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Image: iStock IN THIS ARTICLE Chewing is the first step in the digestion process since compounds in the saliva break starches in our food inside our mouths. The chewing process, also called mastication, is a skill that infants need to master to eat solid food. Besides helping break food into smaller pieces, chewing helps exercise
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Pregnant women may be especially vulnerable to developing more severe cases of COVID-19 following SARS-CoV-2 infection, but little is known about their anti-SARS-CoV-2 immune response or how it may affect their offspring. In a study published in JAMA Network Open, a group led by investigators at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) provides new insights that could
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This article may include advertisements, paid product features, affiliate links and other forms of sponsorship. Some parents just finished the role of in home teacher for the first time…now fitness instructor? The thought of fitting something else into the daily routine is exhausting! But there is always time to have fun. Which begs the question:
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One of the most recognizable characteristics of autism is an amazing diversity of associated behavioral symptoms. Clinicians view autism as a broad spectrum of related disorders, and the origin of the disease’s heterogeneity has puzzled scientists, doctors, and affected families for decades. In a recent study, researchers at Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians and
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If you’ve ever felt, IT’S NOT WORKING! Then watch today’s new show to see if Peaceful Parenting actually does, and what you can do about it. Visit www.theparentingjunkie.com for an ever-growing library of parenting pearls from moi, and sign up for email updates to be an insider on what’s coming up (psst… awesome stuff). Here’s
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Has your child ever complained about an irregular heartbeat? This is a complaint that many children have. Often, children use the phrase “irregular heartbeat” for many different reasons. They may feel like their heart is beating too fast, or they may feel like their heart is skipping beats. In this video, Dr. Jennifer Silva, Pediatric
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Dropping temperatures and a still-raging pandemic means we can count on one thing in January (and truly, maybe only this one thing): we’re gonna be watching Netflix. Because Netflix loves us as much as we love it, they dutifully drop new titles each month, as if, like, we keep burning through TV shows. As much
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There is a great shopping debate around how much true maternity wear you need to purchase for the short-lived pregnancy. And while there are strategic ways to shop non-maternity items that will flex with your changing shape, a handful of maternity brands are worthy of adding to your wardrobe for the duration of your journey.
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Researchers at the Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine have revealed that alterations in fetal microglia resulting from maternal inflammation could contribute towards the onset of developmental and psychiatric disorders. The research team including PhD student OZAKI Kana and Professor YAMADA Hideto et al. from the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology observed that infant mice
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Substances present in cooked meats are associated with increased wheezing in children, Mount Sinai researchers report. Their study, published in Thorax, highlights pro-inflammatory compounds called advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) as an example of early dietary risk factors that may have broad clinical and public health implications for the prevention of inflammatory airway disease. Asthma prevalence
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