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Image: Shutterstock IN THIS ARTICLE Norovirus is a virus that spreads through contaminated food and water, leading to severe gastroenteritis, which causes diarrhea and vomiting (1). The virus is known by several names, such as stomach bug, vomiting bug, or winter vomiting bug. The norovirus infection is commonly referred to as food poisoning or stomach
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Molecules called microRNAs (miRNAs) that are measurable in urine have been identified by researchers at Mount Sinai as predictors of both heart and kidney health in children without disease. The epidemiological study of Mexican children was published in February in the journal Epigenomics. For the first time, we measured in healthy children the associations between
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Extremely low birth weight (ELBW) infants with moderate to large patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) may benefit from transcatheter PDA closure (TCPC) in the first four weeks of life, according to research published by Le Bonheur Cardiologist Ranjit Philip, MD, and Medical Director of Interventional Cardiac Imaging and Interventional Catheterization Laboratory Shyam Sathanandam, MD. Early PDA
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Image: Shutterstock IN THIS ARTICLE You might have heard about the importance of breastfeeding from others, but only you can experience the true beauty of it when your baby latches onto your breast and starts to suckle. Breastfeeding is one of the most significant and emotional events of motherhood. It nourishes the baby and helps
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While the amazing regenerative power of the liver has been known since ancient times, the cells responsible for maintaining and replenishing the liver have remained a mystery. Now, research from the Children’s Medical Center Research Institute at UT Southwestern (CRI) has identified the cells responsible for liver maintenance and regeneration while also pinpointing where they
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Puberty looks different, in terms of both reproductive hormones and breast maturation, in girls with excess total body fat, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society’s Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. Previous studies found that girls with obesity start puberty and experience their first menstrual period earlier than girls with normal
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Let’s be honest. Kids are kids. They get into things, get sick, and then they get better. After going through this routine over and over parents learn to not sweat the small stuff and relax as they become more experienced with nursing their children through ailments. We never really think to ask ourselves if we
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Image: Shutterstock IN THIS ARTICLE The World Health Organization (WHO) defines chiropractic as “a healthcare profession concerned with diagnosing, treating, and preventing disorders of the neuromusculoskeletal system and the effects of these disorders on general health (1).” Chiropractic works on the premise that the human body is a neuromusculoskeletal system, and any disorder in one
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Scientists at the Children’s Medical Center Research Institute at UT Southwestern (CRI) have identified the specialized environment, known as a niche, in the bone marrow where new bone and immune cells are produced. The study, published in Nature, also shows that movement-induced stimulation is required for the maintenance of this niche, as well as the
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Slight differences in clinical features can help physicians distinguish between two rare but similar forms of autoimmune brain inflammation in children, a new study by UT Southwestern scientists suggests. The findings, published online in Pediatric Neurology, could provide patients and their families with a better prognosis and the potential to target treatments specific to each
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Organization is my love language. Even if it’s not yours, consider this: Home is the launchpad of our lives, and if yours is suffocating under the weight of stuff and disorder, your energy, brainpower and well-being are suffering the same fate. Even before Marie Kondo hit the scene, research revealed just how life-changing a tidy
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Antibodies that guard against COVID-19 can transfer from mothers to babies while in the womb, according to a new study from Weill Cornell Medicine and NewYork-Presbyterian researchers published in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology. This discovery, published Jan. 22, adds to growing evidence that suggests that pregnant women who generate protective antibodies after
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